CSA Newsletter – Week 18 – October 17, 2018

by jennifer on October 17, 2018

week 18 2018
THIS IS THE LAST DELIVERY FOR THE SUMMER CSA.
We encourage you to pack your share into your own bags and leave your box at the site. If you do take your box, please return it to the site or farmers market before next Wednesday.

If you still owe $ on your share, please make a payment as soon as possible, or contact us to work out a payment plan.

I can’t believe another season has come and gone. This one flew by particularly fast. It was a bit of a whirlwind for us as there were some crazy conditions to contend with. Most notably was the absence of 2 long time workers. Both Rita and Isaac, 17 and 12 years at the farm respectively, moved on to new life adventures. The both were such great workers and full of knowledge that they readily shared with the new crew. Smoke from wild fires made conditions very unpleasant for a few weeks and had a slight impact on crops. However, the biggest challenge was the heat. We are lucky to have a heavier soil that usually holds moisture well, but it was a challenge to move the irrigation sets through the fields fast enough. All in all, it was an abundant year. We try to plant enough of a diversity in crops and many successions to ensure a good variety in the CSA boxes. We hope you enjoyed your share.

As much as we hate to say goodbye to our favorite summer veggies, we are looking forward to a slightly reduced work schedule. For the next few weeks we will focus on farm clean-up, organization, and inventory. I kind of enjoy the process. I like to have all my ducks in a row going into the winter. Most importantly, I like to do as much as possible ahead of time to prepare for potential floods. There is a lot of “stuff” needed to run a farm on the daily: hand tools, tractors, boxes, bags, scales, greenhouse benches, etc. Anything not tied down can theoretically float away (or suffer damage as in the case of tractors). We have tons of loft space to which we will move all of the stuff we are not currently using and just leave the essentials down in the danger zone. Most years we only experience minor flooding and no water reaches the barns, but I don’t like to risk it. What is the old saying, “An ounce of prevention = a pound of cure”?

WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets or chard
cabbage or lettuce
kale
potatoes-Russian banana
rosemary
yellow onions
red onions
garlic
rutabaga
purple and yellow carrots
kohlrabi
pie pumpkin

ELABORATIONS:
Colored carrots: We grew purple and yellow carrots and they took their own sweet time to mature. These carrots are best cooked, as the texture is not as crisp and delicate as the orange ones. Roast in the oven, cook on the grill, add to a stew, etc
Pie pumpkin:  These babies are delightfully sweet, perfect for pies, muffins, soups, or what have you. Don’t forget to toast your seeds! Rinse seeds, toss with Tamari, and roast in the oven on 400 until crisp. Stir every 5 minutes or so. Takes about 15-20 minutes.
Russian Banana potatoes: I hate you leave you with “ugly” potatoes in the last box, but this variety was hit hard by surface damage. They are so delicious, though. Simply do a rough peel with a potato peeler and you are good to go.
Rosemary: Thank Miles for your extra generous branch of rosemary. If you don’t get around to using it all right away, hang it up in your kitchen and it will dry in about a week. Store in a jar until ready to use.

THANK YOU! Jim and I would like to thank you for joining us this summer. There are so many CSA farms in the area to choose from and we are honored that you settled on us. We hope you will join us next year as well. Registration for 2019 will open up in early January. I will send an email link.

We hope you all have a restful fall and winter. Be sure to come see us at the Olympia Farmers market and Tacoma Proctor market. We plan on being there all fall/winter.

All the Best!
Jen & Jim

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CSA Newsletter – Week 17 – October 10, 2018

by jennifer on October 10, 2018

week 17WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets or chard
kale
spaghetti squash
leeks
potatoes-red chieftain
parsnips
yellow onions
cipollini onions
cilantro
orange and red peppers
green bell pepper-large shares only

ELABORATIONS:
There are a few new items today, so let’s get right to it!
Parsnips: The look like giant white carrots and have a subtle, sweet, earthy flavor. They are best eaten cooked and there are so many ways to do it! Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper and oven roast on high heat until done to your liking. Roast solo or add other roots. Cube and add to soups and pot roasts. Marinade and grilled on the BBQ. Check out our parsnip page for more ideas.
Spaghetti squash: This is a fun squash. The flesh is pretty subtle and slightly sweet. It’s uniqueness lies in its texture which is stringy (in a good way) and can be used as a substitute for pasta. To prepare, cut in half, scoop out seeds, and bake cut side down on a baking dish with about a half inch of water. It is ready when you can pierce the flesh easily with a fork. Drag a fork across the flesh to create long strands and top with your favorite red sauce or pesto.The rind is very hard, so be careful when cutting.

HOUSEKEEPING:
NEXT WEEK is the LAST DELIVERY for the summer CSA. We recommend bringing bags with you to your pick up site so you can leave the wax box behind. If you still have a balance owing on your summer share, please pay it as soon as possible unless we have made another arrangement. Thanks!

If you ordered a storage share, it will be delivered then as well. We still have more storage shares available. If you want one let me know by Monday, Oct 15. This share consists of 10 lbs yellow onions, 2 lbs red onions, 2 lbs cipollini onions, 2 lbs shallots, 1/2 lb garlic, 5 lbs each of 2 types of potatoes, & 15 lbs assorted winter squash.

The early fall share starts Saturday Oct 20th. We still have a few slots left.

I’m going to go enjoy the sunshine. Hope you can, too!

Jen

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CSA Newsletter – Week 16 – October 3, 2018

by jennifer on October 3, 2018

2018 week 16WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets or chard
kale
dill, parsley, or rosemary
sweet peppers
zucchini
potatoes-Amorosa
yellow onions
red onions
shallot
acorn squash
rutabaga
kohlrabi

ELABORATIONS:
Potatoes-Amorosa: You’ve gotten these once or twice before. They are a nice roasting potato or would make a nice addition to a hearty fall soup.
Acorn squash: This is probably the most recognizable squash. It is not as sweet as delicata, hence the tendency for folks to bake this variety with butter and brown sugar. You may want to let it sit around for a few weeks to sweeten up. A quick google search for Acorn recipes yielded this gem:
22 recipe ideas for acorn.
Rutabaga: It looks like a turnip and has a similar flavor, though it is more subtle and earthy. You’ll want to peel it, as the outer skin can be a little tough. I love to mix it in with mashed potatoes using a 1:5 ruta to potato ratio. It adds another level of flavor, richer and more complete. It’s hard to describe, but is seriously worth a try. Go to our rutabaga page for more recipe ideas.
Everything else should be familiar.

ON THE FARM:
Boy was it chilly this morning! One of our employees reported frost at her place, but thankfully we were spared. I’m not quite ready for that! The fields are looking neat and tidy these days. Jim and Alex have tilled in the majority of old crops and weedy patches. Cover crop that was spread last week is now sprouting and resembles beard stubble poking through the dirt. Recent rains followed by sunny afternoons allowed much of the cover crop to sprout before the birds got to it. Between the crows, red winged black birds, and a few persistent pigeons, it is a wonder anything came up!

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CSA Newsletter – Week 15 – September 26, 2018

by jennifer on September 26, 2018

2018 summer week 15

WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets or chard
broccoli
sweet peppers
sweet onions
cipollini onions
potatoes-Yukon gold
lettuce or green beans
kale- Red Russina, lacinato, or curly
summer squash
leeks
winter squash-delicata
parsley, dill, or rosemary

kalekale varieties: curly, lacinato, and red Russian

Much like the leaves turning color on the trees, this week’s box loudly announces that FALL IS HERE! There are so many new crops this week, so let’s dive right in.
Kale: We grow 3 types (see photo). We will rotate these around over the next few weeks. Curly is the most substantial and is good in soups or stir fry when you want your greens to stay firm. Lacinato makes the best kale chips or kale Caesar salad. Red Russian is the sweetest and most tender. It is best for green smoothies, kale quesadillas, or chopped raw in salad.
Leeks: They are in the onion family and can be used in place of onions. They have a stronger, more prominent flavor. Potato leek soup is always a winner. Leek frittatas are also a common dish. I love them in stir fries, winter stews, pot roast, etc. Sometimes dirt gets trapped down in the layers so be sure to cut them lengthwise and fan under running water before chopping.
Potatoes: Yukon Gold. These are similar to Bintje and yellow finn. Delicious baked, fried, grilled, or mashed.They are ideal for potato leek soup, so there you go!
Cipollini onions: These are a flat Italian frying onion. We gave you both red and yellow. They are quite pungent raw, but sweeten up when cooked. They are perfect for caramelizing.
Delicata squash: This in my opinion is hands down the best squash. The flesh is sweet and creamy and the skin is so thin that you can eat it if you wish. Regardless how you cook it, start by cutting in half lengthwise and scooping out the seeds. Try steaming until fork tender. Bake in the oven cut side down in a baking dish with a little water until fork tender. Cut into planks, marinade and grill. Cut into chunks and add to soups. Use it for pie. The possibilities are endless.

ON THE FARM:
We have been graced with more sunny weather and are steadily plugging away at our fall chores. all of the squash is harvested. Garlic is planted. Nearly all of the expired crops are tilled in and we have made a good dent in getting the cover crop spread. We feel a sense of relief and accomplishment every time we cross something off the list.

I’m off to enjoy this sunshine. Hope you can, too!

 

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CSA Newsletter – Week 14 – 2018

by jennifer on September 19, 2018

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THIS IS THE LAST DELIVERY FOR THE HEIGHT OF THE SEASON SHARE FOLKS.
If you wish to continue on for the next 4 weeks, let me know by Sunday.
The cost for a large share is $116 and the small is $88.

WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
garlic
shallot
sweet onion
corn
orange bullhorn pepper
kohlrabi
red bullhorn-large share only
potatoes: Ozette or Amorosa
Italian zucchini
crookneck or patty pan
basil, dill, or cilantro
beets or chard
green beans or broccoli

ELABORATIONS:
Shallot: Shallots are like little onions with a complex, buttery flavor. They are often minced and added to vinaigrette dressing for salads, or sautéed in olive oil as the base of a soup. We make a marinade of equal parts olive oil and balsamic vinegar, 1 shallot, 1/2 tsp salt, and 1 TBLS rosemary and use it for steak, chicken, zucchini, potatoes, carrots, peppers, winters quash, and other veggies cooked on the grill.
Potatoes:
Most of you got Ozette, but we ran out at the last minute and had to sub in Amorosa (red ones) for a few of you. We will make sure you get Ozettes next week! They look like ginger or Jerusalem artichokes with their gnarled and knobby appearance. This particular potato has an interesting 2-fold story. It was brought to the Olympic peninsula around Neah bay in the late 1700’s by Spanish explorers. The Spaniards eventually left, but the Makah tribe in that area continued to grow them ever since. Their amazing flavor and unique story landed them as an entry in the Ark of Taste. Here is an article that goes into a little more depth about it. These potatoes are great for oven roasting, potato salad, pot roast, beef stew, or any other soup calling for potatoes. The second cool part of the story is that the only reason we started growing them was we had a CSA member couple who did not want to garden anymore, but wanted us to continue to grow out the Ozette potatoes they had received and cultivated from friends on the Olympic Peninsula. We started with 5 lbs, saved and replanted the harvest, then saved and replanted the harvest until we had enough to offer to CSA and sell at market. You have the Randall-Duffys to thank for these tasty spuds! I love the exponential nature of seeds and tubers.  A two inch chunck of potato becomes a dozen potatoes. One clove of garlic becomes a head of many cloves. One pod of beans becomes 10 plants which produces a hundred pods possessing hundreds of new seeds. It is really quite magical.

Summer crops are waning, hence so many either/or in the box this week. We will be rotating many crops around for the next few weeks. New crops are on the horizon, however. Kale, rutabaga, leeks, winter squash, parsnips, and colored carrots will start to appear.

This week we hope to get all of the winter squash harvested. And next week will be garlic planting and cover crop spreading. It is always a scramble at the end of the season trying to juggle our usual daily tasks, with giant multi-day harvests, shifts in crew (school, winter jobs, etc), and unpredictable weather. Plus we are all getting a little tired….

That’s all for today.

-Jen

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CSA Newsletter – Week 13 – September 12, 2018

by jennifer on September 12, 2018

2018 summer week 13

WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
green beans
carrots
beets or chard
potatoes-French fingerling
sweet onion
broccoli for half of your (the rest should get it next week)
dill, cilantro, or parsley
Italian zucchini
crookneck or patty pan
green bell pepper
red and orange sweet bullhorn pepper
corn
cabbage
pickling cucumbers

ELABORATIONS:
I am so excited by this week’s box. The last 2 have been slimmer than I would like for this time of year. I think a combination of heat, smoke, deer, and some herb losses to weeds many weeks ago affected our harvests. But with this shift in weather, the plants have perked up and are going for that  last hurrah before fall really sets in. The peppers had been at a mere trickle, but are now super abundant. Two corn patches are on at once so eat up, my friends. And broccoli! Finally broccoli! (But only for half of you this week. The rest of you should get some next week.) The deer are still eating the lettuce, so cabbage will have to be your ruffage for the week. We have several easy and tasty recipes for slaw (both with and without mayo/dairy). They all make bright and refreshing side dishes.
Pickling cukes: While our regular slicing cukes did poorly overall, and the lemons are barely producing, our picklers are still going strong. They make great salad/snacking cucumbers.
Potatoes: French fingerlings are a lovely waxy and delicate potato. They hold up well in soups and potato salad. (It is feeling more like soup weather to me!)
Peppers: All of the peppers we hand out in the CSA boxes are sweet. Not everyone appreciates a hot pepper and I always worry about little kids grabbing a hot pepper and taking a big bite before the parent reads the newsletter.

Speaking of newsletters, my apologies for not providing a newsletter the last 2 weeks. We have been swamped at the farm. There has been so much to do to gear up for the shift in weather and dealing with pickling cucumbers becomes another full time job in and of itself. The cukes are winding down a bit so I can have my life back.

We managed to get all of the onions and dry beans out of the field before this much needed rain arrived. Four of our five greenhouses are filled with onions and shallots. They will finish curing over the next few weeks. Covered real estate on the farm is at a premium this time of year. As the rains return and threat of frost looms, winter squash and potatoes will also need to find a home in the barn without crowding out our work area. Each year we bring this game of produce tetris up to a new level. For example we have invested in more wheeled plant racks with adjustable shelves as well as platform dollies. They allow us to create movable work stations, have mobile storage, and move vast amounts of produce from A to B with minimal lifting. As I get older I am always on the lookout for ways to save our backs.

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onions curing in the greenhouse

Since it has been too wet to weed these past few days (no complaints here!) the crew has been working on cleaning onions and popping garlic in preparation for planting. It is nice to have jobs for any and all weather conditions.

That’s all I have time for right now. Enjoy your box of summer goodness!

Jen

 

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CSA Newsletter – Week 12 – September 5, 2018

by jennifer on September 5, 2018

2018 summer week 12

WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
green beans
garlic
sweet onion
potatoes-Russian Banana
beets or chard
basil
corn
kohlrabi
summer squash
sweet orange or red bullhorn pepper
green bell pepper-small shares only
lettuce
carrots

 

GENERAL MUSINGS:
I feel like we have one foot in summer and the other in fall. Today’s box says summer. Our second planting of corn is now on, the sweet peppers are finally ripening, and basil is abundant. However, chilly mornings, turning leaves, and geese migration indicate a shift in season. We are turning out attention toward fall chores. There is a lot to do before the rains/frosts arrive and the crew shrinks due to school, winter jobs, and travel.

41269118_2231593310203663_671855463461027840_nOnions laid out to dry in 1 of 5 greenhouses

BIG HARVESTS:
With “sprinkles” in the forecast (yay!) at the end of the week, we have to hustle to get a few key crops under cover. Today we spent a huge chunk of the day hauling the rest of the onions into our many greenhouses so they can finish curing.  Dry beans are next in line. The plants have been cut and laid out to dry in the sun. Threshing will become difficult if the pods get wet, so we will try to get them under cover as well before the weather shifts. Within the next few weeks all of the winter squash and potatoes will get harvested as well. There is a sense of urgency lurking in the background.

Although we have been farming since way back in ’94, we continually fine tune what we do and find ways to utilize infrastructure we have in new ways. I’ll give you a few examples.
Greenhouses: We have 5 – 15′ X 50′ greenhouses that we use for starting plants to field plant and to sell in the spring. In the fall we use them as dry covered space to cure onions and in the winter, we pull back the ground cloth in a few to plant arugula, dill, cilantro, and lettuce mix to sell at the market.
Plant racks: A few years ago we bought 4 metal racks with wheels and adjustable shelves to use at market to sell plants. We keep finding other uses for them year round and have purchased 16 more over the past few years. We use them in the cooler to store produce, in the barn to organize supplies, over the winter to store winter squash, and generally to haul large amounts of produce around the barn. As Jim and I get “older”, we are constantly striving to find ways to reduce the amount of lifting and lugging. If we can utilize a dolly, cart, or wheeled rack, we are all over it! We are trying to train our robust and invincible 20-somethings crew to practice proper lifting and use of wheels as much as possible. Oh to be 20….
Other cross purpose “tools” include the all terrain baby stroller (now 19 years old) that we use to mark out beds for transplanting and the industrial REI baby backpack that we use to flame-week carrots. Yes, the backpack that once carried my 2 children ages ago has been repurposed to carry a 5 gallon propane tank used to burn weeds that germinate a week ahead of carrots. Each year we seem to find new ways to use old things. It is one of the things I enjoy about farming.

 

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CSA Newsletter – Week 10 – August 22, 2018

by jennifer on August 22, 2018

2018 week 10WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets for half of you
tomatoes
corn
garlic
sweet onion
potatoes-Bintje
basil or dill
beans-a mix of green, yellow, and purple
lemon cukes
Italian zucchini
crookneck or patty pan squash
cherry tomatoes-large shares only
sweet banana pepper-large shares only

ELABORATIONS:
Beans: We mostly grow green beans, but like to occasionally dabble in something different, hence yellow and purple beans. They look so pretty all mixed together, don’t they? Though the flavor of each varies slightly, they cook up all the same.
Sweet Banana peppers: Yet another dabbling. We have never grown these before, but did so upon customer request. They aren’t as sweet as a red or orange pepper, but are a bit sweeter than a green bell. Use as you would a green bell. We will start rotating around a variety of peppers over the next few weeks.

THE FIELD REPORT:
Though the days feel hot and summery, things are starting to shift. Onion tops are dying back, as are winter squash and potato vines. We will soon be gearing up for the big harvest in which we will harvest and tuck them safely in the barn for fall and winter use. Our garlic seed should be arriving soon and we will poke a gazillion little cloves in the ground to enjoy next year. We struggle with white rot on garlic in our fields, so opt to buy new garlic seed each year. We found a sweet little family run farm in Twisp Washington to provide us with “clean” garlic. They are certified organic and use draft horses as their primary means of field cultivation and management.

Word has it that showers and fresh air are in the forecast. We are all so looking forward to reasonable temps and that first whiff of clean, damp, PNW air. Ahhh….

That’s about all I’ve got this week.

Until next time….Jen

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CSA Newsletter – Week 9 – August 15, 2018

by jennifer on August 15, 2018

summer week 9 2018
WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets for half of you
cherry tomatoes
red tomatoes
corn!
sweet onion
rosemary, basil, dill, or cilantro
potatoes-either Russian Banana, Bintje, or French Fingerling
pickling (salad) cucumbers
lemon cucumber
green beans
kohlrabi
lettuce
Italian zucchini
patty pan squash

ELABORATIONS:
Corn: How very exciting! We have been anxiously awaiting its arrival. We’ve had it every night for dinner since last Friday. Eat it within a day or two, as the sugars turn to starch as soon as it is harvested. This variety is called “Cuppa Joe.” Corn variety names bring on a serious case of the eye-rolls for me. Who comes up with this stuff?
Pickling cucumbers: Don’t worry,  you don’t have to break out the canning kettle. These guys are sweet and tasty and are great for salads and snacking. Occasionally you may come across a bitter one, so take a bite before you add it to your dish. Peeling is optional.
Sweet Onion: The onions have finally sized up! This variety is fairly sweet, but may cause a little bit of eye watering upon cutting.
Lettuce: I forgot to mention last week that the deer having been going to town on our lettuce lately. This is the first year we’ve had a problem with deer in high summer. I imagine the prolonged heat and dry weather have reduced their usual food source, so they have started to dine at the Rising River Buffet. It is very frustrating how they take one or two bites out of each head rather than eat the entire thing.
Beet/chard rotation: The older chard patch needs a rest and the newer one isn’t quite ready. We will hand it out again in a week or two. (I suspect there are groans and hoorah’s in equal measure out there 😉 ) Chard, like cilantro, seems to be a love it/hate it thing. Not a lot of people on the fence about their chard preferences.

There is not much new to report out in the field. We are working our little tails off trying to weed, water, harvest, and distribute. The smoke has been a pretty crazy. I think we all feel like we inhaled chalk dust by the end of the day. What a wild summer. I sure hope this isn’t the new norm.

Stay cool and eat well. Until next week-Jen

 

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CSA Newsletter – Week 8 – August 8, 2018

by jennifer on August 8, 2018

 

2018 week 8

This newsletter will be short and sweet. The heat is kind of kicking our butts lately. Thankfully we start at 6:00 AM and try to be done by 2:30 or 3:00, since we all become virtually worthless after that. Our crew have been real troopers sticking it out until the end.
It’s been a challenge keeping up with the watering, weeding, and harvest. But we are doing our best. Pickling cucumber harvest has begun which means 3 days a week we spend several hours harvesting cukes and then several more washing, sorting, and weighing the harvest. Today we hauled in roughly 700 lbs! I have enough years of perspective to know this frenzy will be temporary, so am trying not allow myself to get overwhelmed.

On that note, if you are interested in pickling cukes, beets, beans, or tomatoes for canning, let me know. We are entering the time of abundance. Our website has info on current pricing.

What’s In The Box: 
carrots
beets or chard
green onions
summer squash
fennel-large shares only
cabbage-small shares only
dill, cilantro, basil, or rosemary
potatoes-French fingerling
green beans
yellow wax beans-large shares only
slicing or lemon cucumber
cherry or slicing tomatoes

Elaborations:
Yellow wax beans: They taste very similar to the green beans, though many on our crew prefer them flavor-wise. They cook up just like the greens. Small shares will get some eventually. We only grew a tiny patch, so we will rotate them around.
French fingerling potatoes: These are my favorite fingerling. The texture is creamy and buttery. The skins are thin and delicate. They are wonderful steamed, oven roasted, or made into Summer Vegetables Stewed In Their Own Juices. Or try the fingerling green bean salad with dill and parsley dressing.
Lemon cucumber: These are an old heirloom cucumber. They do not taste like lemon, but get their name from their appearance. No need to peel these guys. Just slice and eat.

I think everything else should be familiar.

I’m off to finally cook dinner. Something with tomatoes and cucumbers…. Stay cool and keep your fingers crossed for a little rain. Rumor has it we may see showers Friday and Saturday.

P.S. I fought my urge to just give up and order a pizza. (Farmers do that sometimes!) Instead I cranked up my favorite music and made this: Baked chicken breast, the potato/green bean/dill thing mentioned above, and chopped tomato and lemon cukes with cottage cheese. I am now pleasantly stuffed, happy, and ready for bed.
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Jen

 

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CSA Newsletter – Week 7 – August 1, 2018

by jennifer on August 1, 2018

week 7 2018WHAT’S IN THE BOX:
carrots
beets or chard
green onions
garlic
green beans
potatoes-Bintje
green zucchini
Italian zucchini
crookneck or patty pan
cherry tomatoes-small shares
slicing tomatoes-large shares
fennel-small shares
lettuce-large shares
slicing cucumber-large shares
dill, cilantro, basil, or parsley

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Zucchini Fritters

by jennifer on July 25, 2018

Zucchini Fritters

Makes 12 fritters

SAUCE

2 T. butter

2 scallions, white and green parts separated and sliced thin

¼ t. salt

½ t grated orange zest plus ¼ cup juice

1 t. brown or turbinado sugar

¼ t. ground coriander

1 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes (or chopped and cooked fresh ones)

 

FRITTERS

1 ½ pounds zucchini or other summer squash

1 ½ t. salt

6 T. cornstarch

6 oz. feta cheese, crumbled

1 egg, lightly beaten

2 T. minced fresh mint

2 T. minced fresh dill

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 t. pepper

¼ c. oil

  1. FOR THE SAUCE: Melt butter in medium saucepan over medium heat. Continue to cook, swirling pan constantly, until butter is dark golden brown and has nutty aroma, 1 to 3 mins. Add scallion whites and salt and cook until softened, about 2 minutes.  Stir in orange juice and sugar and cook until syrupy, about 3 minutes.  Add coriander and cook about 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes and their juice and orange zest and cook until slightly thickened, about 8 minutes.  Remove from heat, add scallion greens, cover and keep warm.

 

  1. FOR THE FRITTERS: Line a large bowl with clean dish towel. Grate zucchini on large holes of box grater into prepared bowl. Sprinkle salt over zucchini and mix in well.  Let sit 15 minutes. Gather ends of towel to form bundle and twist to squeeze zucchini as dry as possible (you’ll get at least a cup of liquid). Discard liquid and return zucchini to bowl (w/o towel). Stir cornstarch into zucchini until fully incorporated. Stir in feta, egg, mint, dill, garlic, and pepper.

 

  1. Heat 2 T. oil in skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Drop about ¼ cup of batter into pan and press into a flat, round fritter about 3″ diameter.  Cook until well browned and slightly crisp, about 4 minutes per side.   Serve with sauce.

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