CSA Newsletter – Week 16 – October 1, 2014

by jennifer on October 1, 2014

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REMINDER: There are two more deliveries after today. The week of October 15 is the last week. We still a few fall and storage shares left. Sign up soon if you want one.

BULK PRODUCE: You don’t have to get storage share to get storage produce. We sell 10 and 25 lb bags of onions, shallots, potatoes, squash, carrots, and beets. Check out our storage crops page for varieties and pricing. Email us your order and we can bring it to your pick up site sometime in the next few weeks.

We are gifted yet another gorgeous sunny day. I am just amazed by how awesome the season has been all along. It makes me so very happy.The garlic arrived from Peaceful Valley Farm supply and we are just about done breaking off the cloves in preparation to plant. Unfortunately, we have to let the soil dry out just a little more before we can prep the ground for planting. Just a few more days….

What’s in the Box:
Leeks
Lettuce
Red onion
Yellow onion
Shallot
Buttercup squash
Red potatoes
Orange carrots
Yellow carrots
Garlic
Rutabaga
Parsley or chives
Beets or kale
Green beans-large share only
Sweet pepper-either red or green
Summer squash

ELABORATIONS;
Buttercup squash: It is a lot like kubocha squash. The flesh is dense, sweet, and creamy. It is a good stuffing squash or for use in soup, either pureed or chunked up. NOTE: If you ever bake a squash and it is kind of bland and unfit for the dish you intended, use it to make Cinderella pumpkin muffins.
Rutabaga-a hidden gem in the root vegetable world. Rutabaga is kind of like a turnip in flavor, but more subtle and a little more sweet. It is great raw, like on a veggie platter or added to salads. Most folks usually cook with it. I like to add it to mashed potatoes. Use one fist sized per 6 fist sized potatoes. I can’t even describe how it improves the potatoes. It somehow rounds out the flavors. Cut into bite sized chunks and add it to an oven veggie root roast, add to a pot roast, soup, etc. It is a good idea to peel it, as the skin can be a little woody.
Potatoes: The variety is Red chieftain. We actually washed these guys for you. (Last week I said we weren’t going to wash them anymore.) The potato digger damaged the surface skin somewhat, so they will not last for months on end like an “unscathed” potato. They’ll keep for weeks in your fridge, if need be. But I’m sure you’ll use them up. Perhaps in potato leek soup!
Leeks: Besides making potato leek soup, you can use leeks for all sorts of dishes. Think of it as an onion with a more distinctive flavor. They are really good in soups and stir fries. I especially love them in the deep winter when there isn’t as much fresh veggies around. Leek are comprised of many layers of leaves and dirt can get trapped deep down in there. The best way to prep it is to cut it in half lengthwise and fan the layers under running water. Then chop in thin half moons and off you go.
Shallots: Shallots are like a fancy onion. They, like leeks, have a more prominent, distinctive flavor. They are often minced into a vinaigrette dressing, or sauteed in butter as the base of a soup. (Really, what isn’t good sauteed in butter?)
Green beans: Yesterday’s harvest was paltry compared to last weeks. Only large shares get them and only a small amount.

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